Admin

Process Skills of STEM

Schools began in the United States in 1837 with the purpose of teaching students an organized curriculum of basic content. As schools have evolved over the next two centuries, the focus on content learning has remained as the single most important function of a school. However, with the advent of the information age, content has become readily accessible to anyone with internet access and the amount of content has increased exponentially. In fact, in an IBM Marketing Cloud study, 90% of the content accessible has been created since… 2016.

As we begin to think about how we properly educate our students for this changed world, the value of content knowledge has been surpassed by the value of process thinking.

“The Ready-To-Go employee for our company is a person who knows how to collaborate, is able to critically think, and brings fresh ideas to the table. We will train you on the content.”

--Fortune 500 VP

What does this mean? The structure of schools must change to provide students with the opportunity to be successful in this changed world. No longer is content the only ultimate outcome, process thinking is vitally important, if not more.

The schools of the 21st century that will provide students with the education needed to flourish in this century will be the schools that balance process learning with content learning. In this new paradigm of education, STEM School Chattanooga has developed and integrated process into the core

After meeting with multiple businesses, higher education and community partners, three main process tenets surfaced as vital to student post school success: collaboration, critical thinking and innovation. These core tenets have become the central theme to a students education at STEM School Chattanooga.

Vertical Progression for Collaboration, Critical Thinking, and Innovation:
9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade
Collaboration Diversity
Work with others different than me
Accountability
 Hold teammates accountable
Time Management
Manage time for team projects
Networking
 Network with experts and professionals
Critical Thinking Personal Ownership
 Start with self in using resources and acquiring knowledge
Evaluation
Quality control, reflecting on work and how to improve
Prototyping
Iterative process, developing and testing multiple solutions
Expert Knowledge
Applying expert and professional knowledge in solution development
Innovation Originality
 Be original in your work
Failure Redefined
Application not working is part of the process
Desirability
 Create desirable products and solutions
Invent
Define problem, develop solution and invent new product

 

The instructional model we use for implementing the process learning follows the format of model, guide, monitor and release. Each stage is described below:

  • Model: This is similar to “I do”. Teachers model and explain what the tenet is. Teachers develop structures and tasks that are teacher led that provide students with opportunities to see how the tenet is implemented.
  • Guide: This is similar to “we do”. Teachers provide tasks for students to implement the tenet. However, teachers provide support alongside the students as they implement the tasks.
  • Monitor: This is similar to “you do”. Teachers provide tasks for students to do and students report out to the teacher on progress. Teachers intervene when progress is not made.
  • Release: This is where the students are independent in their application of the tenet. There is no teacher input in how the students are applying the tenet.

  • Instructional Program - Model, Guide and Monitor Activities - 9th Grade:

    Collaboration: Diversity
    Model:
    • Each teacher creates Google Selfie Slide that includes Myers-Briggs Personality Type (MB) and shares with students.
    • Each teacher completes MB Analysis Tool to answer questions regarding their own MB traits and their team members MB traits, and shares the completed MB Analysis Tool with students. (TEACHER: TEACHER)
    • Each teacher explains how he/she interacts with other teachers based on MB.
    • Teacher chooses PBL group for Unit 1 PBL with students members from within their own MB temperament (Guardian - SJ, Artisan - SP, Rationalist - NT, Idealist - NF).
    • Teachers lead icebreaker activities with the students, such as 4 Corners where students move to a location with other students based on similar traits.
    Guide:
    • Each student completes MB Analysis Tool to answer questions regarding their own MB traits and the teachers’ MB traits. (STUDENT:TEACHER)
    • Teacher coaches students on how to interact/connect with teachers based on the student’s MB and teacher’s MB.
    • Teacher chooses PBL group for Unit 2 PBL with student members such that there is no more than one member from each MB temperament (Guardian - SJ, Artisan - SP, Rationalist - NT, Idealist - NF).
    • Teachers and students discuss and use MB to create roles and responsibilities for Unit 2 PBL Contract.
    Monitor:
    • Each student completes MB Analysis Tool to answer questions regarding their own MB traits and the traits of their Unit 3 PBL partners’ MB traits. (STUDENT:STUDENT)
    • As part of contract for Unit 3 PBL submitted to teacher:
      • Students choose PBL group partners in Unit 3 and justify their choices using MB.
      • Students choose roles and responsibilities and justify their choices using MB.
    • Students interact/connect with peers in their Unit 3 PBL group w/ teacher guidance.
    • Teacher monitors groups and provides verbal feedback in Weekly Progress meetings.
    Critical Thinking: Personal Ownership
    Model:
    • Teachers present PBL rubric for Unit 1.
    • Teacher discusses personal role in developing the rubric with the teacher team and in developing individual subject area requirements.
    • Teacher completes self-improvement form (what did I contribute, what will I improve, what are action steps I will take to ensure that occurs) for the Unit 1 PBL rubric and shares with students.
    • Teachers create a Unit 1 PBL Pacing Guide with required deadlines for tasks and assignments during the PBL.
    • Teacher facilitates each student completing the self-improvement form during the Unit 1 PBL Weekly Progress meetings to check on the progress of tasks by each student and next steps based on the contract roles and responsibilities.
    Guide:
    • Teachers coach each Unit 2 PBL group in the creation of the Unit 2 PBL Contract, including:
      • using the Unit 2 PBL Pacing Guide to create deadlines for tasks,
      • labeling which student(s) are responsible for each task,
      • and assigning roles and responsibilities for each group member.
    • Teacher holds Weekly Progress meetings assisting students in completing the self-improvement form through discussion of progress, remediation, and next steps of PBL tasks based on the Unit 2 PBL Contract and Pacing Guide.
    • Teachers assess individual student performance in the Unit 2 PBL groups and provide feedback using the PBL rubric and the self-improvement form.
    Monitor:
    • Student teams create Unit 3 PBL Contract that is turned in to the teacher for approval, including:
      • using the Unit 3 PBL Pacing Guide to create deadlines for tasks,
      • labeling which student(s) are responsible for each task,
      • and assigning roles and responsibilities for each group member.
    • Student teams hold Weekly Progress meetings completing the self-improvement form that is presented to the teacher.
    • Student completes reflection based upon self-improvement forms and teacher feedback from Unit 1 through 3 and develops individual personal goals for Unit 4 PBL.
    • Teacher approves personal goals for Unit 4 PBL.
    Innovation: Originality
    Model:
    • Teacher provides and explains model(s)/exemplar(s) for Unit 1 PBL.
    • Teacher facilitates group discussion with Unit 1 PBL groups where teachers and students analyze how the Unit 1 PBL product differs from the model.
    • Non-PBL: Teacher models use of digital fabrication process.

    Guide:
    • Teachers provide model(s) for Unit 2 PBL but students are not allowed to replicate.
    • Students submit written analysis for Unit 2 PBL product including the following:
      • What elements of the product were inspired by the model?
      • Justification for how the product is original without replication.
    • Non-PBL: Students choose digital fabrication technique to learn.

    Monitor:
    • Teachers provide information/tutorials for intended product(s) for Unit 3 PBL.
    • Students create Unit 3 PBL product without any model that includes:
      • Analog design plans/sketch
      • Prototype iterations
      • Final product
    • Non-PBL: Students choose/use digital fabrication process and create authentic piece.


    Instructional Program - Model, Guide and Monitor Activities - 10th Grade:

    Collaboration: Accountability
    Model:
    • Teacher is PBL group leader for all PBL groups.
    • Teacher directly helps in making the contract for each group.
    • Teacher holds weekly meetings with each of their groups.
    • Teacher delegates work, holds other teammates accountable, and assigns interventions to students falling behind.
    • Teacher models what is expected of student group leaders and how students can hold each other accountable.
    Guide:
    • Teacher becomes “cranky” group member.
    • Students self elect leaders within PBL groups, with teacher guidance.
    • PBL groups conduct weekly meetings with teacher present as a group member.
    • Teacher guides student teams through work delegation and accountability by becoming the stubborn group member that refuses to move on unless things are handled appropriately.
    • Teacher meets with group leader occasionally to provide leadership support.
    Monitor:
    • Students self elect leaders within PBL groups, with teacher guidance.
    • Teacher does not attend any PBL group meetings, unless requested by a student leader.
    • Student leaders meet with teacher on a weekly basis to debrief after group meetings and receive support.
    Critical Thinking: Evaluation

    Weekly Prototype Reports contain written sections that require students to assess themselves on a weekly basis. The following is a link to the Weekly Prototype Report students had to complete for the Hunter Museum PBL.

    Model:
    • All PBL groups complete Weekly Prototype Reports (WPR’s) section for evaluation questions.
    • Teacher walks groups through how to compete WPR’s and provide meaningful evaluations for themselves.
    • During group meetings, teachers and students complete WPR’s together.
    Guide:
    • All PBL groups complete WPR’s.
    • Teacher acts as a resource for WPR’s, but does not directly influence student work unless requested by student leader or quality of work is being ignored.
    Monitor:
    • Teacher goes over WPR’s with student leaders during their weekly meetings.
    Innovation: Failure Redefined
    Model:
    • All PBL groups complete Weekly Prototype Reports (WPR’s) section for failure redefined questions.
    • Teacher walks groups through how to complete WPR’s and helps students identify failure points that garner information which will help students improve their products.
    • During group meetings, teachers and students complete WPR’s together.
    Guide:
    • All PBL groups complete WPR’s.
    • Teacher acts as a resource for WPR’s, but does not directly influence student work unless requested by student leader or quality of work is being ignored.
    Monitor:
    • Teacher goes over WPR’s with student leaders during their weekly meetings.

    Instructional Program - Model, Guide and Monitor Activities - 11th Grade:

    Collaboration: Time Management
    Model:
    • Teacher generates a student pacing guide for a unit of study
    • Pacing guide includes:
      • Daily tasks
      • Breakdown dates for progression
      • Due dates
    • Teacher demonstrates/think aloud a specific example of how to break down a large task into manageable pieces
    • Teacher walks students through inputting dates/study times into calendar
    Guide:
    • Student generates a pacing guide for a unit of study in format provided by the teacher
    • Format includes sections for:
      • Daily tasks
      • Breakdown dates for progression
      • Due dates
    • All student pacing guides are assessed by teacher
    • Teacher periodically adds to pacing guide/has students update accordingly
    Monitor:
    • Student submits a pacing guide for teacher review
    • Student can modify format of pacing guide to meet individual needs
    • Only students who require additional support meet with teacher (focus groups)
    • Teacher periodically checks pacing guides to monitor student use of pacing guide on as needed basis

    Critical Thinking: Prototyping

    Model:
    • Teacher generates prototypes through an iterative process and creates an end product
    • Teacher uses think-aloud to unpack his/her progression of iterations/prototypes
    • Teacher demonstrates any related skills for creation of prototype
    Guide:
    • Student generates product with prototypes
    • Teacher provides rubric to all students for product and prototype expectations
    • Teacher provides input/feedback in prototyping stages to each student
    Monitor:
    • Students submit each prototype to teacher
    • Teacher provides input/feedback to students requiring additional support (focus groups)

    Innovation: Desirability

    Model:
    • Teacher identifies desirable product and how it addresses a problem
    • Teacher identifies intended audience/client/customer/end user for the desired product
    • Teacher unpacks criteria for product and why product is desirable for the user
    Guide:
    • Student identifies a desirable product and how it addresses a problem
    • Student identifies intended audience/client/customer/end user for the desired product
    • Teacher supports students in making connections on why it is desirable for the end user
    Monitor:
    • Student identifies a problem
    • Student identifies a user group
    • Student creates a desirable product (and associated criteria) that addresses the problem and meets the needs of the end user
    • Teacher assists students in need of support (focus groups)

    Instructional Program - Model, Guide and Monitor Activities - 12th Grade:

    Collaboration: Networking

    Model:
    • Teacher identifies a contact outside of school to engage
    • Teacher models drafting a professional email to include:
      • Greeting/Introduction
      • Salutation/Signoff
      • Purpose for email
      • Relevant content/questions/information
      • Formal writing/professional language
      • Spelling and grammar checked
      • General formatting
    Guide:
    • Student selects contact outside of school to engage
    • Teacher provides professional contact email template/checklist
    • Teacher provides input/feedback to each student
    Monitor:
    • Student identifies contact outside of school to engage
    • Student generates email and adjusts to suit context (no template) and copies teacher on the email
    • Teacher monitors as needed (focus groups)

    Critical Thinking: Expert Knowledge

    Model:
    • Teacher uses transparent thinking to identify personal experience requiring them to acquire expert knowledge
    • Teacher explains process of how they acquired expert knowledge, including but not limited to:
      • Resources
      • Challenges
      • Thought process
    Guide:
    • Student identifies area requiring expert knowledge
    • Student and teacher work in conjunction to generate plan/process of acquiring expert knowledge
    Monitor:
    • Students identify areas requiring expert knowledge
    • Students generate plans/process how to acquire it and submit plans to teacher for review
    • Teacher assist students on an as needed basis (focus groups)

    Innovation: Invent

    Model:
    • Teacher identifies problem/need and invention/solution
    • Teacher walks student through creation of product/idea/assignment
    • Teacher analyzes how and why it was invented
    Guide:
    • Student identifies problem/need and invention/solution
    • Student analyzes invention of product/idea/assignment
    • Student analyzes how and why it was invented
    • Teacher provides input/feedback during the student’s process
    Monitor:
    • Student identifies problem/need
    • Student invents solution/product/idea/assignment etc.
    • Student submits problem and solution to teacher for review
    • Teacher provides support on as-needed basis (focus groups)
    All content © 2019 Hamilton County Schools. All rights reserved. | Privacy Notice | Website by School Messenger